Ethos Media


Leave a comment

Welcome to the EthosFilmBlog from EthosMedia

  • Activity books. To watch, to do, together. Ideal for family film nights.
  • Blogs. Articles by Ethos writers. For every type of reader.
  • Movie Moments. Perspectives to download and print. Perfect for events and publications.
  • Take-One. Discussion-starters with leader’s guides. Ideal for film nights.
  • Viewer’s Guides. Stimulating background. Make the most of the film.

For subject categories, click on these links…


Leave a comment

Goodbye Christopher Robin: Comfort in our troubles

Download this print-ready version

‘His childhood was sacrificed to make other childhoods better’ says Will Tilston about the title character he plays in Goodbye Christopher Robin.

This is the latest film providing a surprising back-story to a popular children’s book. But unlike Saving Mr. Banks, Miss Potter and Finding Neverland (which primarily focus on the mind of the writer) Goodbye Christopher Robin also shows the impact on the story’s main character, who is a real person – the author’s eight-year-old son.

Continue reading


Leave a comment

Victoria and Abdul: Valuing old age

Download this print-ready version

Victoria and Abdul may appear to be a simple linear story about an unexpected relationship between an ageing queen (played by Judi Dench) and her Indian servant (played by Ali Fazal). But scattered through the narrative are profound moments which provide important insights into the invisible inner life of many people in their final years.

We first see Victoria as she is hauled from her bed to be dressed, decorated and wheeled out for ceremonial occasions, where she nods off out of boredom. Who would think that, within this old body, still lives a real person with the capacity to learn, laugh and love?

Continue reading


Leave a comment

Churchill: Power in weakness

Download this print-ready version

With the strapline “The icon you know. The man you don’t”, Churchill offers an unusual perspective to consider the mind of this great wartime leader (brilliantly played by Brian Cox who gives what film critics have described as ‘a master-class in acting’). And like all good art, this iconoclastic movie causes the viewer to think again about our assumptions and preconceptions. Here, we don’t just see the strong stable person that we assume Churchill to be because of his inspirational speeches and place in history. Rather we experience a thought-provoking viewpoint on some of the personal struggles behind his public rhetoric and robust decisions.

Continue reading


Leave a comment

Dunkirk: Communal heroism

Download this print-ready version

Christopher Nolan, the writer and director of Dunkirk describes the true event on which it is based as ‘one of the greatest stories in human history’. Brilliantly bucking the trend of recent war films he does not resort to gore and special effects, as he provides an immersive experience that enables the viewer to empathise with the young soldiers in their apparently hopeless situation, trapped between the sea and the advancing German army.

By cleverly moving around the timeline, we experience the different perspectives on land, sea and air.

Continue reading


Leave a comment

Hidden Figures: Getting there together

Download this print-ready version

Hidden Figures is the true story of how men and women, black and white, worked together to put a man in space. The film recounts the largely unknown contribution of three black women, whose gifts were crucial to the success of the space program. Kevin Costner describes it as ‘a story of three women whose God-given abilities were allowed to flourish and make a difference’.

Continue reading


Leave a comment

Hidden Figures: Take-One.TV video discussion starter

Hidden Figures tells the true story of African-American women who played a vital role at NASA during the early years of the U.S. space program.

Download this video by right-clicking on this link and choosing ‘save target/link as’

Discussion questions:

Download this print-ready version

  1. Given that the true events in this film happened in 1962, why has it taken so long for their stories to be told?
  2. Al Harrison, the project leader played by Kevin Costner, says ‘We all get there together or we don’t get there at all.’ To what extent is that true in our society?
  3. Theodore Melfi, who directed the film, describes the women as ‘the heroes behind the scenes’. In our society, in what ways does the value placed on people in the media affect how we value those whose back-room roles are hidden?
  4. Kevin Costner, who played the project leader Al Harrison, says ‘It’s a story of three women whose God-given abilities were allowed to flourish’. How might the belief that all abilities are ‘God-given’ make a difference to the way in which we value them, and allow them to flourish?
  5. These women’s roles are only now publicly recognised because they were portrayed in a film. It could be argued that this reinforces the assumption that abilities are only valued if they are depicted in the media. Do you agree or disagree, and why?

Additional resource for churches and RE teachers:

This Bible Brief explores a biblical perspective on the issues raised in this discussion starter video. Continue reading